Spring Art Fairs Kick Off for Buyers and Browsers Alike


Frieze New York is upon us, which means an explosion of art fairs over two weeks, most but not all of them in Manhattan. These fairs are where dozens of leading galleries and dealers from around the world exhibit their best, and sometimes, the best of art history. Here are our picks for a crawl around the city, based on what your art heart desires (or wallet and weekend time allow). And be sure to ask dealers for prices; often they are not conveniently posted.

The pricey, sprawling fair is back at the Shed in Hudson Yards, this year with more than 60 galleries and a new curator for “Focus,” its showcase of nascent galleries and under-the-radar artists. An online viewing room opens the week before the fair, offering a first look and digital entry for remote visitors, and a performance-themed program will run throughout the show. Early bird tickets are already sold out. Preview tickets for Thursday and Friday start at $129; general admission weekend tickets are $76 ($37 for students). May 1-5 at the Shed, 545 West 30th Street, Manhattan; 212-463-7488; frieze.com.

For more traditional fare, the fair centered on American art from the 18th century through the 21st century is back for its 17th year with 17 exhibitors. Explore hundreds of works, including landscapes, portraits, still lifes and sculptures, across three floors of the grand Bohemian National Hall. Admission is free. May 11-14 at the Bohemian National Hall, 321 East 73rd Street, Manhattan; theamericanartfair.com.

The fair dedicated to bringing contemporary art from Africa and its diaspora into the mainstream returns for its 10th year with its largest edition to date. This time around, 1-54 is relocating to Chelsea for a presentation of more than 30 galleries from Lagos and Lausanne to Miami and London. General admission is $38 ($25 for students and seniors). May 1-4, at the Starrett-Lehigh Building, 255 11th Avenue, Manhattan; 1-54.com.

The European Fine Art Foundation (TEFAF), from the Netherlands, returns with a worldly collection of art, antiques and design work to fill the cavernous halls of the Park Avenue Armory, along with a robust slate of programming. Last year our critic recommended a “scavenger hunt” approach. Single-entry tickets are $55 ($25 for students); multiple-day entry tickets are $75. May 10-14 at the Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue, Manhattan; tefaf.com.

Its essence is in the name. Seasoned buyers and novices alike can build their collections from an accessible assemblage at the Affordable Art Fair, which returns with a showcase of contemporary artworks priced from $100 to $12,000. Admission starts at $41. On Thursday, visitors can get free admission with a donation of an art supply. March 20-24 at the Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 West 18th Street, Manhattan; affordableartfair.com.

Clio’s so-called anti-fair for artists without gallery representation is back, featuring a range of work, including painting, sculpture, photography, mixed media and installations, as well as a section titled “Why War?” and a performance program centered on the theme “Hidden Love.” Tickets are free from noon to 8 p.m. on Friday. General admission tickets for Saturday and Sunday start at $12. May 2-5 at 550 West 29th Street, Manhattan; 347-583-3690; clioartfair.com.

The fair that highlights small-business art galleries and the artists they support (and operates on a profit-sharing model) is back. Future Fair, founded in 2020, hosts 60 galleries from around the world, with a fresh aim to create an environment for new voices to thrive. General admission starts at $32; a joint ticket for entry to Future and 1-54 is $45. May 1-4 at Chelsea Industrial, 535 West 38th Street, Manhattan; futurefairs.com.

The New Art Dealers Alliance, which showcases young galleries and facilitates events that nurture the growth of emerging artists and curators, will present its 10th edition of NADA New York with 92 galleries, art spaces and nonprofits from 15 countries. A single-day ticket is $55; multiday passes are $75. Senior and student tickets are available on site for $35. Guided tours led by the architect and designer Komal Kehar are available for an additional $25. May 2-5 at 548 West, located at 548 West 22nd Street, Manhattan; newartdealers.org.

New this year is Esther, a boutique fair created by the New York dealer Margot Samel and a dealer in Estonia, Olga Temnikova, of the gallery Temnikova & Kasela. The fair will be at the ornate, wood-paneled club rooms of the Beaux-Arts building on 34th Street, a gathering space for New York’s Estonian community, and will feature 25 galleries from around the world. May 1-4 at the Estonian House, 243 East 34th Street, Manhattan; esther.ee.

The micro fair, organized by the dealer Eric Firestone (and on view in his walk-up loft), returns for its second year. That ’70s Show bills itself as an “alternative” to the fairs of Frieze and as a community of artists who celebrate one another. This year it will feature 18 New York galleries presenting artists who created work during the 1970s. Entry is free. May 3-5 at 4 Great Jones Street, Manhattan; 70sshownyc.com.

The smaller-scale Independent fair — manageable with a limited window of time — showcases established artists and lesser-known sides to their work. Returning for its 15th edition, the fair will present works from 88 galleries by more than 130 artists, 39 of whom are making their New York debuts. Day passes start at $38; a run-of-show weekend pass is $75. May 9-12 at Spring Studios, 50 Varick Street, Manhattan; independenthq.com.

Presented by the online art gallery Saatchi Art, the fair that calls itself a deviation from elitism will offer affordable artworks ($100 to $10,000) by 120 independent artists. Expect immersive installations, mixed-media exhibitions, performances and D.J. sets. Opening night tickets start at $45; general admission is $23. Tickets bought on site cost slightly more, so book online for the discount. May 16-19 at ZeroSpace, 337-345 Butler Street, Brooklyn; theotherartfair.com.



Source link

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top